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On Friday, May 18th WPS made two announcements. One was that the pending legal battle between the league and magicJack owner Dan Borislow was settled out of court. This news should have put any WPS fan in a good mood and fill them with hope of the league’s return. The second announcement, though expected, left no doubt in the fan’s mind that it wouldn’t return. In the second press release , the board of governors decided to suspend all league operations indefinitely.

This week’s chat will explore the larger meaning of the WPS finale.

Q1: WPS Lawsuit Settlement

  • Was this the sole reason for the suspension of league operations, a small part of it, or no part at all? Why or why not?
  • Are there any winners in this settlement? Who? Why or why not?
  • Was Facebook the best communication medium to use for this announcement? Why or why not?

Q2: WPS Suspends All League Operations

  • Did this announcement catch you off guard? In what ways? Why or why not?
  • What impact did WPS have on the landscape of women’s professional soccer in the U.S.A.?
  • Was Facebook the best communication medium to use for this announcement? Why or why not?

Q3: Women’s Professional Soccer

  • What pressures are now on the two major professional leagues?

Join us on Monday at 8pm ET to throw your thoughts into the mix. Just log on to TwitterTweetchat, or Tweetgrid, and use the #WPSchat tag.

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Women’s soccer is cranking up this week. WPSL Elite and USL W-League open their seasons and the U-17 CONCACAF Women’s Championship is being played. The WSPL season opener will feature the Boston Breakers visiting ASA Chesapeake Charge on Thursday, May 10th. This Friday, the USL W-League will kick off as VSI Tampa Flames take on the Charlotte Lady Eagles in Charlotte, N.C. Then on May 7th the national teams in the U-17 CONCACAF tournament will play their final group games and on May 12th a champion will be crowned.

Tonight’s chat is a smorgasbord; try a little bit of this and a little bit of that. From the U-17 CONCACAF tournament to the start of the WPSL and USL W-League seasons, there is plenty here to satisfy even the hungriest women’s soccer fan.

Q1: U-17 CONCACAF Women’s Championship

  • The US has dominated play in their group thus far, is there a team that could knock them off?
  • Canada has dominated play in their group, should we expect a Canada vs. US final?
  •  Who could be the underdog in the playoff? Why?

Q2: WPSL Elite Opening Week & Season

  • Will you be following the opening week and season?
  • How will you be joining the action (going to games, following online, etc)?
  • Have you chosen a team to cheer for? What team? Why them?

Q3: USL W-League Opening Week & Season

  • Will you be following the opening week and season?
  • How will you be joining the action (going to games, following online, etc)?
  • Have you chosen a team to cheer for? What team? Why them?

Join us on Monday at 8pm ET to throw your thoughts into the mix. Just log on to TwitterTweetchat, or Tweetgrid, and use the #WPSchat tag.

If you happened to be in terminal B at Logan International Airport Thursday night, you may have notice an unusual feeling in the air like something big was about to happen. And it did– with the arrival of Kyah Simon and Tameka Butt, the two Breakers Australian internationals.

The two young, rising Matilda stars are personable, lively, and just plain nice. After 24 hours filled with travel and claiming their luggage, they took a moment for pictures and to answer some questions from Pitch Side View.

How was your trip?

Almost in unison, they both say “Long” with a good laugh. Tameka: “It is good to finally arrive in Boston after a long flight.”

What is it like to finally arrive in Boston?

Tameka: “It is a bit cold, but really exciting. Can’t wait to meet the girls [the Breakers] and get out on the pitch.”

What are you looking forward to the most?

Kyah: “Getting out on the training pitch with the girls, finally getting a feel for American style of football. Being coached by two female coaches it’s something that I’ve never experienced, and I don’t think Tameka has either.”

Who are you most looking forward to playing with?

Kyah: “It’s a matter of finally getting to training and seeing which players you work off. Hopefully the whole team gels as a whole, and you play really well together. You won’t know until you finally get on the field and give it a go.”

What are your goals for the team and yourself?

Tameka: “I hope we win the play offs. For myself, to be able to fit into a team. It’s a different football culture over here to Australia.”

Kyah: “To get to the playoffs as well. Obviously, we’re both competitive, and we want to win.  Meeting new friends as well as teammates. Hopefully that good relationship off the pitch can really pay off on the pitch.”

What will you miss most about home?

Both Tameka and Kyah will miss their “family and friends” and Tameka quickly adds “the beach” to the list.

What are you looking forward to doing in Boston and the States?

Tameka: “We were just talking about that and we’ve got to go to the baseball, basketball, hockey. We want to see that all the different sports we don’t have at home.”

Kyah: “Hopefully getting our way to New York at some stage and seeing a few of the other big cities.”

Tameka: “We’re both 21 this year, so we are looking forward to a trip to Las Vegas.”

A special thanks to Kyah and Tameka for sitting down to do this interview after their flight and long day. Click here for pictures of the session (photos copyright Courtney Sacco).

Biographies:

Kyah Simon – Kyah is the superstar of the future for the Australian National Team. She debuted in the national team program with the under 15 team. She scored the winning PK that gave the Matildas the 2010 AFC Women’s Asia cup. In the 2011 World Cup she lead the team in scoring with 2 goals in the tournament.

Tameka Butt – Tameka captained the under 17 Australian women’s national team from 2007 to 2009. She scored the equalizer in the league finals game for her former club the Brisbane Roar of the Australian W-League before they succumb to a goal against by the eventual champions Canberra United.

The future of women’s soccer in the United States of America was volatile when WPS made the decision to suspend the 2012 season due in part to resolving legal disputes. This period was short-lived as two established leagues positioned themselves to fill that gap. The WPSL has filled the demand by pushing up the date to create their Elite league by a year, bring in former WPS clubs the Red Stars, the Breakers, and the Flash, and having the teams sign talented players from the WPS. The USL W-League already had a pro league but are now able to increase the talent pool by signing former WPS players. Both leagues will start play in the week of May 7th. But does this mean the future of women’s soccer is safe?

The chat will look to explore the future all be it without a time machine and answer what does the future of US women’s soccer look like at the professional level, college level, and youth level.

Q1: US Women’s Professional Soccer

  • Is there enough demand to support two leagues, possibly three (return of WPS)? Why or why not?
  • Could or should there be inter-league play?
  • What impact does this split have on the structure of professional soccer and feeding system for the national team?
  • What complications does this create for players?

Q2: College Level Women’s Soccer

  • What impact does having or not having a professional league have on the college game?
  • What new decisions are players now confronted with when deciding their future after school?
  • What impact would be felt by athletic programs at universities?

Q3: Youth Level Women’s Soccer

  • What impact does having or not having a professional league or role models have on the interest of youth toward the game?
  • Does this change the landscape of the youth women’s game? Why?
  • What is the trickle down impact that could be felt by youth organizations?

Join us on Monday at 8pm ET to throw your thoughts into the mix. Just log on to TwitterTweetchat, or Tweetgrid, and use the #WPSchat tag.

“Elite”. One word, that is all you need to describe WPS, the players in the league, the coaches, and now the WPSL (Women’s Premier Soccer League). After WPS suspended the 2012 season, its teams, players, and coaches were left with two options; await the 2013 season to start playing or find a way to get on the field this year. Enter the WPSL. They are creating an Elite league which will include WPS teams the Boston Breakers and the Western New York Flash, former WPS team Chicago Red Stars, and FC Indiana.

One of the fears that came out of WPS suspending the 2012 season and the recent memory of the failed WUSA was what will happen to women’s professional soccer in the U.S. now. “The WPSL recognizes the importance of a professional women’s soccer league in America,” WPSL Commissioner Jerry Zanelli said. “And that it is critical to provide a showcase for these top women players, and to inspire young athletes. We have put together a plan that will allow WPS teams individually to join the WPSL in the Elite League. Officially, they will not be professional teams, but would allow our top professional players to play in a highly competitive league.” WPSL has always looked to support and improve women’s soccer in the US and this is just another part of that initiative. “We have said all along that we will do anything to help improve women’s soccer in U.S.” said Zanelli. “This is a step in keeping that process going.” Breakers coach Lisa Cole saw this as a necessity when at a youth camp, “This is why this has to happen,” she said. “These girls have to have these players in their lives. The excitement that they bring from talking to the professional player is so important. The influence that these players have on others’ lives is tremendous.”

This is another endorsement of the women’s game along with the flood of tweets from players and fans. Boston Breakers Associate General Manager Lee Billiard has seen this first hand. “After the suspension of WPS was announced, we received overwhelming support from our fan base and sponsors,” he said. “Internally, it was clear for us to keep the Boston Breakers in the community and to provide an avenue for players to train and play at a competitive level. We are delighted with the outcome and happy to announce the Boston Breakers will be playing again in 2012 and stepping up our community outreach programs.” Leslie Osborne ,frequent tweeter, was moved by the support when she tweeted “It’s very important (to) keep this franchise around, (We) have (the) best fans.”

With the suspension of the season, one big question on everyone’s minds is what is next for WPS players? This concern is well expressed by  Lisa Cole. “The first week was really, really hard; the conversations I had with each and every player on the team were hard,” Cole said. “Some players were extremely disappointed, some were mad, some players were in disbelief. You’re so close to a dream and it just doesn’t happen.” She went on to say “I love how they’ve responded now. Our team especially has been upbeat and positive in social media… They’ll be playing to keep their dream alive.”

But what does it all mean for the future of WPSL elite league and WPS? Jerry Zanelli, WPSL commissioner,  had this to say. “Our main purpose was to find ways to continue to have the highest possible level of soccer for women in the United States,” Zanelli continued, “and to help prepare for the return of professional women’s soccer in 2013. We also wanted to make it financially viable for present WPSL teams to join the Elite League and raise their level of play.” The elite league will look to expand in 2013 to the west coast. Interest has come from San Diego, Los Angeles, Sacramento, Bay Area, and Seattle.

What do you think about partnership between WPS and WPSL? Is this a good way to keep interest in women’s professional soccer? Or does this water down the progress WPS had made?

Welcome to another special edition #WPSchat with our friends at Our Game magazine.

The US Women’s National Team has been in the spotlight over the past month due to their domination in the CONCACAF qualifying tournament for the Olympic games. Most notably is the young talent that was on display in the final versus Canada where Alex Morgan scored twice and assisted on two more for the US. The youth movement is prevalent in the US national program, no more so in the next star on the scene– Morgan Andrews.Ryan Wood, editor at Our Game magazine,  had the opportunity to sit down with the rising star. We asked Ryan to join this week’s chat to discuss the article, the player, and the youth movement. You will find the interview on page 20 of the February issue.

A week ago,WPS released big news that the 2012 season would be suspended. Since then players have been vocal from posting elaborate blogs to tweeting concern, disbelief, and support. That ripple was felt as well by Our Game Magazine who had an interview feature with then new member of Sky Blue FC Manon Melis by Ciara McCormack. A funny story for the crew at the magazine came out of it (we’ll let them tell it though.) You will find the interview on page 5 of the February issue.

We here at Pitch Side View are excited to be partnering with Our Game again to bring you this chat. Make sure you check out these articles and others in the current issue of Our Game magazine.

Q1: The Youth Movement (Player profile Morgan Andrews) with Ryan Wood

  • What was is like interviewing the rising star?
  • Is her off-field personality different from her on-field personality?
  • How soon do you see her making the jump to the first team?
  • Give us some highlights of her career?

Q2: Center Stage (Manon Melis) with Ciara McCormack

  • Tell us what happened when you learned the news of WPS suspending the 2012 season?
  • What did you have to do to get the article ready to go for this issue?
  • What is next for Manon Melis?
  • What were her thoughts on WPS suspending the 2012 season?

Join us on Monday at 8pm ET to throw your thoughts into the mix. Just log on to TwitterTweetchat, or Tweetgrid, and use the #WPSchat tag.

It feels great to be back in #WPSChat mode after a brief winter break!

Even in the off-season, exciting plays are being made. In this case, not by players but by Dan Borislow and WPS. Developments last week allow magicJack to play exhibition games this year, and avoid further legal action. Borislow was quoted as saying “It was a win-win-win here,” said Borislow via email. “I won, the league won and my team won. The fourth win is actually the fans and soccer.”  This week’s topic was suggested by longtime chat participant, unwavering advocate of women’s soccer, and Canadian through and through. Thanks to @Ingridium for the great suggestion!

Q1: Women’s Professional Soccer

  • How is this a win for WPS?
  • In what way may WPS lose with this outcome?
  • Will this confirm the detractors of the league? Why or why not?
  • What complications could come about from this decision?

Q2: Dan Borislow

  • How is this a win for Dan?
  • In what way might Dan lose with this outcome?
  • What are possibilities that Dan faces?

Q3: magicJack Team & WPS Players

  • How is this a win for the players?
  • In what way may the players lose with this outcome?
  • What does this mean for magicJack Team?

Join us on Monday at 8pm ET to throw your thoughts into the mix. Just log on to TwitterTweetchat, or Tweetgrid, and use the #WPSchat tag.

It is hard to believe that the 2012  draft is less than a month away. Just last week, the WPS site released a list of top picks for the 2012 WPS Draft  in run up to January’s events. And this gives us an opportunity to look at how these new players can affect the league.

As the 2011 season played out, many WPS teams became aware of their deficiencies and one of the key ways to address them is in the draft. In years past, WPS draft picks have made big impacts for their teams, in the league, and in the world of soccer. 2010 WPS rookie of the year Ali Riley was the right fit for FC Gold pride, helping them win a championship. 2011 Rookie of the year Christen Press was a top 5 leader in the league for scoring. Overall #1 picks Tobin Heath and Alex Morgan have been stellar in international play, helping the USWNT to be one of the best in the world. The draft has proved that women’s college soccer programs develop quality players that are WPS ready.

The chat wants to know where you thought teams needed to improve from the 2011 season, which college players you think will stand above the rest, and who has the ability to come out strong in their WPS debut to bring balance and improve team performance.

Q1: The 2011 Season

  • The Beat: where do the need to improve most from the 2011 season?
  • The Breakers: where do the need to improve most from the 2011 season?
  • The Flash: where do the need to improve most from the 2011 season?
  • The Independence: where do the need to improve most from the 2011 season?
  • Sky Blue: where do the need to improve most from the 2011 season?

Q2: The Prospects

  • Which players have the talent to make a big impact on WPS in 2012?
  • What are your top 5 picks coming out of college?
  • Who do you think will be in the running for the 2012 WPS rookie of the year?

Q3: The Perfect Fit

  • Which college players fill the gap for your WPS team? Why?

Join us on Monday at 8pm ET to throw your thoughts into the mix. Just log on to TwitterTweetchat, or Tweetgrid, and use the #WPSchat tag.

Welcome to another special edition #WPSchat with our friends at Our Game Magazine.

Recent events have shone a light on the business side of sports– be it the WPS sanctioning or the NBA and NFL contract disputes. As I was reading the December issue of Our Game Magazine, I was reminded of the human side of this sport. The Letter from the Editor set this tone for me where Editor-in-Chief Tiffany Weimer talks about how her life has changed thanks to soccer. Throughout the issue, I kept seeing this theme from The Ali Krieger Story which chronicles one player’s inspirational story to Officially Famous that spotlights the best women referee tandem. These talented people may not have the chance to shine if not for the opportunities offered them by top leagues like WPS.

All too often, business takes the center stage in sports. In business, many times economics out-weighs social responsibility and humanity. In WPS, I’d go as far as to say the reverse is the case– whether we realize it or not. Should WPS fail, the impact will be more than one more failed business venture. There are real consequences in terms of the jobs of players, referees, front office staff, and coaches, not to mention the dreams of American youth, the progress of current players and the sport itself.

We here at Pitch Side View suggest you check out these articles and others in the current issue of Our Game Magazine.

Q1: The Human Side

  • What does the possible closure of WPS mean for players?
  • What does the possible closure of WPS mean for referees?
  • What does the possible closure of WPS mean for coaches?
  • What does the possible closure of WPS mean for soccer programs, organizations, and camps?

Q2: The Progress

  • What loss in the gender equality of soccer and sports will be seen?
  • What loss in the progress and development of women’s soccer will be seen?
  • Will it be a step back or road block for the dreams and aspirations of soccer folks? Why?

Join us on Monday at 8pm ET to throw your thoughts into the mix. Just log on to TwitterTweetchat, or Tweetgrid, and use the #WPSchat tag.

The topic on everyone’s mind this week is the sanctioning– or should I say the “not sanctioning”– of WPS by the United States Soccer Federation (USSF).

Like any professional soccer league in the United States, WPS is up for annual review and sanctioning by the governing body USSF. A standard for sanctioning a division 1 league (highest level) requires the league to field a minimum of 8 teams. In 2011, WPS had six teams and the league was sanctioned as division 1 by receiving a waiver. With only 5 viable teams, they are once again applying for a waiver the 2012 season. The application is under review by USSF and the two parties continue to work towards an agreement.

The chat will look to get your thoughts on delayed sanctioning, the possibility of the league not being sanctioned or sanctioned as a different division, and what impact that will have for 2012.

Q1: Delayed Sanctioning News

  • What impact is this having on the WPS brand?
  • Will this build support for the league? Why or why not?
  • Will this confirm the detractors? Why or why not?

Q2: Sanctioned or Not

  • What impact will not being sanctioned have for WPS?
  • What impact will being sanctioned as a different division have for WPS?
  • What are possibilities the league faces?

Q3: The Future: 2012

  • As fans, what does the sanctioning mean to you? Why?
  • What impact does the sanctioning have for players and future players?

Join us on Monday at 8pm ET to throw your thoughts into the mix. Just log on to TwitterTweetchat, or Tweetgrid, and use the #WPSchat tag.

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